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Eight in ten employees want remote work to stay

- June 24, 2020 2 MIN READ
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  • 28 per cent of respondents want to work from home full-time and permanently.
  • 39 per cent want to work from home one-to-two days a week
  • 20 per cent want to work from home three-to-four days a week.

Thanks to the coronavirus crisis the world has undergone the biggest flexible work experiment we are likely to see in our lifetime and the results have not gone unnoticed.

A new survey of people working from home during the pandemic has found that 86 per cent want to continue doing so, at least part-time- even once their workplace resumes ‘normal’ operations.

What’s more, 73 per cent believe their employers would be open to it, and 22 per cent have already been offered a work-from-home option.

If employees have their way, Aussie workplace may permanently change the way they operate with a switch to flexible and remote work options as the norm rather than the exception.

The survey conducted by digital event specialists Redback Connect found after social restrictions lift, 28 per cent of respondents want to work from home full-time and permanently, 39 per cent want to work from home one-to-two days a week, and 20 per cent want to work from home three-to-four days a week.

Just 14 per cent are too afraid to ask their managers to allow them to work from home, and 8 per cent have had their work-from-home request rejected by their employer.

Interestingly, the younger the employee, the less courage they have to ask their employer to make permanent working from home arrangements.

Almost a quarter (24 per cent) of Gen Z respondents aged 18 to 30 admit they are too afraid to make the request, compared with 14 per cent of Millennials and Gen Xers.

Similarly, younger employees are less likely to have been offered a permanent working-from-home arrangement, or, if they have asked for one, it has been declined. Just 15 per cent of respondents aged 18 to 30 have already been offered a work-from-home option, compared with 21 per cent of employees aged 31-50, and 30 per cent of employees older than 51.

How can Aussies work from home productively?

The last couple of months of home-based working, however, has also shed light on what digital and virtual meeting tools are needed to increase productivity. In fact, 50 per cent of respondents say working from home would not result in a fall in productivity, if they had the right digital tools. A third (33 per cent) say that, with the right technology, their organisation would actually increase its productivity.

When asked about what digital capabilities can help maximise at-home productivity, 55 per cent of respondents say tools that enable them to have virtual meetings or webinars with multiple attendees.

The same proportion (55 per cent) say tools that allow them to share and edit documents, projects, or work schedules with team members in real-time. Nearly half (46 per cent) of respondents believe they need to able to see the ‘availability’ of other team members remotely. While 45 per cent say they want the ability to share work-in-progress schedules and status reports with other team members. Forty-two (42) per cent say they need to present work to stakeholders in the same way as in an in-person meeting.

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